Articles Tagged with trial

jomar-thomas-271602-copy-300x200The United States is one of the few countries with a judicial system founded on the principle of democracy. This system of justice offers us an orderly and peaceful way to decide criminal cases. Additionally, the judicial system punishes the ones found guilty, resolves civil disputes, and protects our civil rights. Thus, the judges in Chicago have to uphold the United States Constitution and the Constitution of the State of Illinois. This is by interpreting and enforcing laws in individual cases. These judges and staff are always ready to do what it takes to maintain a court system that meets the highest standards of judicial performance.

One of the most notable changes and commitments is the introduction of electronic court systems in Chicago. This is not a new thing, especially for the federal court system, which went paperless more than 15 years ago. But, switching to the electronic court system is still a change that has dragged on in most circuit courts. Currently, you might even see some Chicago Circuit Court clerks spending their time carrying stacks of folders.

After years of relentless lobbying by frustrated attorneys, Chicago was able to take a step forward and join other counties in the digital world. This is ensuring that most of the businesses of the courts are done online, embracing electronic court systems.

jakob-owens-96965-unsplash-copy-200x300The Office of Jury Administration is in charge of producing qualified teams of jurors for trials in Chicago. Jurors play a big role in ensuring that all citizens’ rights are protected during trial. Jury service is a crucial and serious responsibility that all US citizens share.

The aim of the court is to ensure that the jury’s service is easy and reliable. To attain this, the jury administration’s office implements smooth and innovative exercises aimed at making the jurors’ convenience and comfort a priority. Jurors can sometimes be summoned for direct service in criminal cases or as part of a reserve of jurors.

When jurors report for a service, they are expected to serve for at least one trial. A juror is given a random panel number. The panels are also divided into random groups of six or 18 jurors. The juror then takes part in the orientation process while outlining the trial process, which includes watching a video with pertinent information. When a case is ready to begin, a deputy sheriff is sent by the judge to summon the appropriate and applicable jurors in the jury room. These are usually determined by previously answered questionnaires. By the end of the first day of service, a juror will be in the jurors pool, or still in a court for jury selection. If this does not happen, then one is often excused from additional services.

Bail violations are violations of the terms of your release from prison while you are awaiting trial. There can be many conditions imposed as part of your bond, and a violation of any one of them can result in serious criminal penalties, including being sent or returned to prison.

What is a Bond Violation?

If you have ever seen a modern “cop” drama on television, you are aware of the concept of bond, or bail. After you are arrested, in most cases you can give the state of Illinois some amount of money to hold as a type of collateral, or insurance, to ensure that you will appear for your court date, or comply with other conditions while you await trial.  If you follow all of the conditions of your release and show up for trial, that money is refunded to you. If you break any of the conditions of your bail or fail to appear for your trial, you could not only forfeit the bail money, but you could face even more criminal charges than you are already facing.

When a person is arrested and faces criminal charges that may result in jail time, there is often a lengthy period of time between the initial arrest and the trial. During the time between your arrest and the eventual trial, bail can be posted, allowing you to remain free until trial.

What is Bail?

People post bail by paying money as a guarantee that they will not flee the area and that they will return for the trial. As long as the offender out on bail appears in court for trial, the money is returned. If the defendant does not return to the court, the bail money is forfeited.