Articles Tagged with anti-terrorism law

joris-v-541657-unsplash-copy-300x200Javier Garcia, the 22-year-old man who drove an SUV into the Woodfield Mall in Schaumburg, has been charged with terrorism. Illinois State Law defines terrorism as any act that causes more than $100,000 worth of damage to a building with five or more businesses inside of it. Unluckily for Garcia, malls apply. He faces a second count of criminal property damage.

Investigators say that this was a planned attack and that Garcia had searched for the Woodfield Mall, including aerial shots of the mall. He seemed particularly interested in Sears for some reason, but no motive for the act has yet been unearthed. 

Those who were there on the scene when Garcia drove his SUV through the mall recall the vehicle barrelling through kiosks and shoppers running panicked for their lives. Garcia was caught on video browsing in Sears, then he left the building and drove his vehicle into the store. Police said that Garcia narrowly missed a children’s train that had children riding on it. While no one was hit by the car itself, three people had to be taken to the hospital with minor injuries.

gus-ruballo-158652-copy-300x200Airplane carriers have faced some criticism for removing passengers who are already booked on a flight. Some have argued that it is a violation of the contract to carry law while others put it down to bad customer care. Recently there was a particularly embarrassing incident when a passenger was forcibly evicted in such a violent manner that he sustained significant injuries, which were then shared with the world via social media.

From a legal point of view, the question was whether the actions of the carrier were justified and legal. This is the intersection of civil liberties and consumer protections. For example, there are questions about whether a carrier can arbitrarily refuse to carry a passenger. There are exceptions that are based on security considerations, but more often than not, the issues in the USA involve overbooking. The behavior of the carrier representatives can also constitute a cause for criminal and civil action.

Sensitivities of Aviation Law